All posts by Sian Gwilliam

I am a TV Production Consultant. In my downtime I run a group ticketing concierge company called MyCultureClub.com, and write about cultural and educational events.

England moves to Step 4 from 19 July

INFORMATION FROM GOV.UK

Working safely during coronavirus (COVID-19) – Performing Arts

From 19 July fully vaccinated people returning to England from amber list countries will not need to quarantine.

In England from 16 August

If you’re fully vaccinated or under 18, you will not need to self-isolate following close contact with someone who has COVID-19. You’ll still need to take a PCR test and self-isolate if it’s positive.

While cases are high and rising, everybody needs to continue to act carefully and remain cautious. This is why we are keeping in place key protections at step 4 from 19 July:

  • TESTING when you have symptoms and targeted asymptomatic testing in education, high risk workplaces and to help people manage their personal risk.
  • ISOLATING when positive or when contacted by NHS Test and Trace.
  • border quarantine: for all arriving from red list countries and for those people not fully vaccinated arriving from amber list countries.
  • cautious guidance for individuals, businesses and the VULNERABLE whilst prevalence is high including:
  • whilst Government is no longer instructing people to WORK FROM HOME if they can, Government would expect and recommend a gradual return over the summer
  • Government expects and recommends that people wear FACE COVERINGS in crowded areas such as public transport;
  • being outside or letting fresh air in
  • minimising the number, proximity and duration of social contacts.
  • encouraging and supporting businesses and large events to use the NHS Covid Pass in high risk settings. The Government will work with organisations where people are likely to be in close proximity to others outside their household to encourage the use of this. If sufficient measures are not taken to limit infection, the Government will consider mandating certification in certain venues at a later date.

WHAT IS A COVID PASS?

An NHS COVID Pass shows your coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination details or test results. This is your COVID-19 status.

You may be asked to show your pass to get into some events, where the COVID Pass is being trialled, or to travel abroad.

USEFUL LINKS FOR PRODUCTION

BECTU TV rates

Employment Status Guidance – HMRC

PMA – Production Managers Association

TV Watercooler – Freelancer website for TV professionals (great for entry level)

Standard Broadcaster Budget Formats

HMRC Meal allowance rates

UK GDPR

Holiday Pay Calculator

BUDGET TEMPLATES DPP

OFCOM CODE

BAFTA

HMRC Employment Status Manual

WFTV – The leading membership organisation for women working in creative media in the UK

US CASTING AGENCIES DIRECTORY

PACT UK – Producers Alliance for Cinema and Television – the UK’s trade association for independent producers

CREATIVE DIVERSITY NETWORK

BRITISH FILM COMMISSION

FILMING IN ENGLAND

4SKILLS – Opportunities to begin and develop your career in the media industry with @Channel4 and friends! http://facebook.com/Channel4Skills http://instagram.com/Channel4Skills

DIRECTORS UK

THE TV MINDSET –

A place to support the mental health of TV & Film freelancers and bring meaningful change to working practices in the industry. Founded by @adeelamini.

RTS – The Royal Television Society is for everyone with an interest in TV. Follow us for TV news, events and awards

DCMSArtsandCulture

PACT

SCREENSKILLS

SHARE MY TELLY JOB – promoting flexible work and job share opportunities for TV freelancers. Creators of The Time Project

Production Update – The Roadmap out – step 3 & step 4

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/covid-19-coronavirus-restrictions-what-you-can-and-cannot-do

STEP 3

Gatherings of over 30 people will remain illegal

Indoors, the Rule of 6 or 2 households will apply – we will keep under review whether it is safe to increase this.

Up to 30 people will be able to attend weddings, receptions and wakes, as well as funerals. This limit will also apply to other types of significant life events including bar mitzvahs and christenings.

STEP 4

The government hopes to be in a position to remove all legal limits on social contact

We hope to reopen remaining premises, including nightclubs, and ease the restrictions on large events and performances that apply in Step 3. This will be subject to the results of a scientific Events Research Programme to test the outcome of certain pilot events through the spring and summer, where we will trial the use of testing and other

techniques to cut the risk of infection.

COVID-19 ISOLATING GUIDANCE FOR PRODUCTION

COVID-19 ISOLATING GUIDANCE  – ((18.JUN.21)- always check the latest guidelines from GOV UK when isolating, and advising production teams and crew to isolate.

Info on isolation due to testing positive from COVID-19 from GOV UK

What are Covid-19 symptoms ?

a new continuous cough

a high temperature

a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia)

What types of covid tests are available ?

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests

Lateral Flow Device antigen (LFD) tests also known as Rapid Lateral Flow tests

What happens if I have received one or more doses of COVID-19 vaccine?

While COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to reduce the likelihood of severe illness for those who have received them, we do not yet know for certain by how much they reduce the likelihood of a vaccinated person spreading COVID-19 to others.

What happens if I have COVID-19 symptoms or have received a positive COVID-19 test result?

Your isolation period starts immediately from when your symptoms started, or, if you do not have any symptoms, from when your test was taken. Your isolation period includes the day your symptoms started (or the day your test was taken if you do not have symptoms), and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month (or if you did not have symptoms but your first positive COVID-19 test was taken on the 15th), your isolation period ends at 23:59 hrs on the 25th.

What happens if have a negative COVID-19 PCR test?

You can stop isolating as long as:

you are well

no-one else in your household has symptoms or has tested positive for COVID-19

you have not been advised to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace

What do I need to do if I am isolating at home ?

You should spend as little time as possible in shared spaces such as kitchens, bathrooms and sitting areas.

Use a separate bathroom from the rest of the household where possible

You should use separate towels from other household members, both for drying yourself after bathing or showering and for drying your hands. Keep your room well-ventilated by opening a window to the outside.

Those who are clinically extremely vulnerable should be supported to minimise their contact with other people in the household during this period, regardless of whether others have symptoms or not.

You should make sure you wash your hands, cover coughs and sneezes, and clean your home to reduce spread of infection.

Keep indoor areas well-ventilated with fresh air, especially shared living areas

What should I do to look after my health and well being ?

There are many sources of support and information, such as guidance on looking after your mental health and wellbeing and on supporting children and young people.

Every Mind Matters provides simple tips and advice to take better care of your mental health, including a COVID-19 hub with advice for those staying at home.

Remember by staying at home, you are helping to protect your friends and family, other people in your community and the NHS.

If you need medical advice

Health and care services remain open to help people with all health conditions, including COVID-19. Most people with COVID-19 will experience a mild illness which can be managed at home. Find out more about managing the symptoms of COVID-19 at home

Resources;

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection

COVID SUPERVISOR CREDITS

  • ITV Studios
  • Covid Executive
  • Get Me Out of Here
  • The Voice
  • Saturday Night Takeaway, Saturday Night Takeaway Drama,
  • Dancing on Ice,
  • Gary Barlow’s Night At The Museum and across all entertainment departments. Worked closely with ITV Risk Team.
  • Tiger Aspect
  • Covid Production Executive – work across all labels/ scripted productions, Worked closely with Cat Fox HOP, and First Option Safety
  • Naked
  • Covid Consultant/Supervisor
  • Tonight With Target, The Rap Game.
  • Mitre, 
  • Covid Supervisor to Ant & Dec.
  • Alaska
  • Covid Consultant
  • ZNAKTV
  • Covid Consultant
  • 2LE Media
  • Covid Consultant/ Supervisor
  • Next Of Kin
  • Covid Consultant
  • Entertainment One, Covid Consultant
  • LocazoPro, Covid Consultant

Production covid update 3.June.21

WORK ADVICE

You should continue to work from home if you can. When travelling within the UK, you should aim to do so safely and plan your journey in advance.

WORKPLACE COVID SECURE GUIDELINES

COVID-secure rules, including social distancing requirements, continue to apply in the workplace. COVID-secure guidelines are available for sectors across the economy to substantially reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.

See guidance for restrictions on businesses and venues in England

WORK MEETINGS

You can gather in a group larger than six people or two households indoors or in a group larger than 30 people outdoors where it is necessary for your work. When working, you should remain 2 metres from anyone you do not live with, or at least 1m with additional mitigations

MAY 17 RESTRICTIONS – Headlines

OUTDOOR GATHERINGS

Outdoor gatherings are limited to 30 people and indoor gatherings are limited to 6 people or 2 households (each household can include a support bubble, if eligible).

SOCIAL DISTANCING

Instead of instructing you to stay 2m apart from anyone you don’t live with, you are encouraged to exercise caution and consider the guidance on risks associated with COVID-19 and actions you can take to help keep you and your loved ones safe.

OUTDOOR EVENTS

People can attend indoor and outdoor events, including live performances, sporting events and business events. Attendance at these events is capped according to venue type, and attendees should follow the COVID-secure measures set out by those venues.

HOSPITALITY

Indoor hospitality venues such as restaurants, pubs, bars and cafes can reopen.

INDOOR SPORT

Organised indoor sport can take place for all. This includes gym classes. It must be organised by a business, charity or public body and the organiser must take reasonable measures to reduce the risk of transmission.

HOLIDAY ACCOMODATION

All holiday accommodation can open, including hotels and B&Bs. This can be used by groups of up to 6 or 2 households (each household can include a support bubble, if eligible).

SUPPORT GROUPS / CHILD GROUPS

Support groups and parent and child group gathering limits have been increased to 30 people (not including under 5s)

FACE COVERINGS

You must wear a face covering in many indoor settings, such as shops and places of worship, and on public transport, unless you are exempt or have a reasonable excuse. This is the law. Read guidance on face coverings.

TRAVELLING IN ENGLAND

You must not share a private vehicle in groups larger than 6 people (except when everyone present is from no more than 2 households), unless your journey is made for an exempt reason.

There is additional guidance on safer travel, including on the safe use of public transport.

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL

There is no longer a legal restriction or permitted reason required to travel internationally.

TRAFFIC LIGHT SYSTEM

A traffic light system for international travel has been introduced, and you must follow the rules when returning to England depending on whether you return from a red, amber or green list country.

UK TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS

People planning to travel to England should follow the guidance on entering the UK.

Check the UK Travel restrictions here.

If you travel to one of these countries or territories, you should look at the rules in place at your destination and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) travel advice. You should do this even if you are returning to a place you’ve visited before.

RED LIST ARRIVALS – HEATHROW

Heathrow starts processing arrivals from ‘red list’ countries in separate airport terminal. LHR has begun processing arrivals from RED LIST countries in a dedicated terminal following (overdue) concerns about them mixing with other passengers. Travellers arriving from RED LIST nations on direct flights are being taken to T3.

IF YOU HAVE COVID-19 SYMPTOMS

If you have symptoms you should continue to get a PCR test. If you’re not sure, you can find out which coronavirus test you should get.

You must self isolate if you test positive. Do not meet up with others and follow the stay at home guidance.

RAPID FLOW TESTING

Rapid lateral flow testing is now available free to anybody without symptoms. You can get your tests from pharmacies, testing sites, employers, schools, colleges and universities.

Find out more about how to get rapid lateral flow tests

UK PRODUCTION USEFUL LINKS & DOCS

Close Contact Cohorts and increased screening for COVID-19 – protocol for TV production

Guidance for people working in performing arts (UK GOV)

Broadcaster guidance (Latest version published Tuesday 19th January 2021 – version 6)

BFC high-end TV & film production guidance (Last updated 1st April 2021)

17th May: What’s changed in UK Covid Restrictions

England has now moved into Step 3 of the Covid Roadmap. Indoor events with an audience are permitted, but capacity restrictions will apply.

Audiences should also be arranged so that they do not mix outside their own group (a group of six or two households/bubbles indoors; or a group of no more than 30 people outdoors).

Producers looking to film with a studio audience should ensure they read the Government’s performing arts guidance, which contains the relevant COVID guidance on audiences.

17th May: What’s changed in UK Covid Restrictions

Restrictions have been eased following the move to step 3. However we must continue to exercise caution. You should follow this guidance on what you can and cannot do. It is underpinned by law and applies across England.

You should also follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of coronavirus at all times, including if you have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

You should continue to work from home if you can. When travelling within the UK, you should aim to do so safely and plan your journey in advance.

You should get a PCR test and follow the stay at home guidance if you have COVID-19 symptoms.

  • Gathering limits have been eased. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 30 people and indoor gatherings are limited to 6 people or 2 households (each household can include a support bubble, if eligible).
  • New guidance on meeting friends and family emphasises personal responsibility rather than government rules. Instead of instructing you to stay 2m apart from anyone you don’t live with, you are encouraged to exercise caution and consider the guidance on risks associated with COVID-19 and actions you can take to help keep you and your loved ones safe. Remember that the risks of close contact may be greater for some people than others and in some settings and circumstances, there will be specific guidance that you will need to follow even when you are with friends and family.
  • Indoor entertainment and attractions such as cinemas, theatres, concert halls, bowling alleys, casinos, amusement arcades, museums and children’s indoor play areas are permitted to open with COVID-secure measures in place.
  • People can attend indoor and outdoor events, including live performances, sporting events and business events. Attendance at these events is capped according to venue type, and attendees should follow the COVID-secure measures set out by those venues.
  • Indoor hospitality venues such as restaurants, pubs, bars and cafes can reopen.
  • Organised indoor sport can take place for all. This includes gym classes. It must be organised by a business, charity or public body and the organiser must take reasonable measures to reduce the risk of transmission.
  • All holiday accommodation can open, including hotels and B&Bs. This can be used by groups of up to 6 or 2 households (each household can include a support bubble, if eligible).
  • Funeral attendance is no longer be limited to 30 people, but will be determined by how many people the COVID-secure venue can safely accommodate with social distancing. Limits at weddings, wakes and other commemorative events have been increased to 30 people. Other significant life events, such as bar/bat mitzvahs and christenings, will also be able to take place with 30 people.
  • The rules for care home residents visiting out and receiving visitors have changed, allowing up to five named visitors (two at any one time), provided visitors test negative for COVID-19.
  • All higher education students are able to access in-person teaching.
  • Support groups and parent and child group gathering limits have been increased to 30 people (not including under 5s)
  • There is no longer a legal restriction or permitted reason required to travel internationally. A traffic light system for international travel has been introduced, and you must follow the rules when returning to England depending on whether you return from a red, amber or green list country.

If you’re in an area where the new COVID-19 variant is spreading

This new variant is sometimes referred to as the variant first identified in India. It is spreading fastest in:

The new COVID-19 variant spreads more easily from person to person. To help stop the spread, you should take particular caution when meeting anyone outside your household or support bubble.

In the areas listed above, wherever possible, you should try to:

  • meet outside rather than inside where possible
  • keep 2 metres apart from people that you don’t live with (unless you have formed a support bubble with them), this includes friends and family you don’t live with
  • minimise travel in and out of affected areas

You should also:

  • Get tested twice a week for free and isolate if you are positive
  • Continue to work from home if you can
  • Get vaccinated when you are offered it, and encourage others to do so as well
  • Refer to local health advice for your area (linked above)

You should get tested for COVID-19. This includes:

You should self-isolate immediately if you have symptoms or a positive test result for COVID-19. There is financial support if you’re off work because of coronavirus.

Keeping yourself and others safe

Face coverings

You must wear a face covering in many indoor settings, such as shops and places of worship, and on public transport, unless you are exempt or have a reasonable excuse. This is the law. Read guidance on face coverings.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable, you could be at higher risk of severe illness from coronavirus.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable, you are no longer advised to shield. However, you should continue to follow the guidance for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable and are advised to continue taking extra precautions to protect yourself, such as limiting close contacts, shopping or travelling at quieter times of the day, keeping rooms ventilated and washing your hands regularly Your employer is required to take steps to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace.

If you have been vaccinated against COVID-19

To help protect yourself and your friends, family, and community you should continue to follow all of the guidance on this page even if you’ve been vaccinated against COVID-19.

The vaccines have been shown to reduce the likelihood of severe illness in most people. Like all medicines, no vaccine is completely effective, so those who have received the vaccine should continue to take recommended precautions to avoid infection.

Whilst emerging evidence suggests vaccines are having an impact on transmission, we do not know by how much the vaccine stops COVID-19 from spreading. Even if you have been vaccinated, you could still spread COVID-19 to others, even if you do not display symptoms.

Getting tested for COVID-19

Rapid lateral flow testing is now available free to anybody without symptoms. You can get your tests from pharmacies, testing sites, employers, schools, colleges and universities.

Find out more about how to get rapid lateral flow tests

Testing twice a week will help make sure you don’t have COVID-19, reducing the risk to those around you.

If you have symptoms you should continue to get a PCR test. If you’re not sure, you can find out which coronavirus test you should get.

You must self isolate if you test positive. Do not meet up with others and follow the stay at home guidance.

Meeting family and friends outdoors

You should continue to minimise the number of people you meet within a short period of time to limit the risk of spreading coronavirus (COVID-19). Most restrictions on meeting people outdoors have been lifted, but gatherings must not exceed 30 people unless covered by a legal exemption, such as:

  • for the purposes of work or volunteering
  • to provide care or assistance for disabled or vulnerable people

If you are meeting friends and family, you can make a personal choice on whether to keep your distance from them, but you should still be cautious. You should read the guidance on meeting friends and family.

Meeting friends and family indoors (rule of 6)

It is safer to meet people outdoors. This is because COVID-19 spreads much more easily indoors. However, you can meet up indoors with friends and family you do not live with, either:

  • in a group of up to 6 from any number of households (children of all ages count towards the limit of 6)
  • in a group of any size from up to two households (each household can include an existing support bubble, if eligible)

If you are meeting friends and family, you can make a personal choice on whether to keep your distance from them, but you should still be cautious. You should read the guidance on meeting friends and family.

If you’re in a support bubble

If you are eligible to form a support bubble, you and your support bubble count as one household towards the limit of 2 households when meeting others indoors. This means, for example, that you and your support bubble can meet with another household, even if the total group size is more than 6 people.

Where you can meet indoors

You can meet in a group of 6 or a larger group of any size from up to 2 households (including their support bubbles) indoors in places such as:

  • private homes
  • retail
  • indoor hospitality venues, such as restaurants, bars and cafes
  • indoor sports and leisure facilities, such as gyms, sports courts, and swimming pools
  • personal care, such as spas
  • indoor entertainment and visitor attractions, such as museums, theatres, and indoor play areas

Remember to follow guidance on how to stop the spread of COVID-19, such as letting in fresh air.

When you can meet with more people

Gatherings above the limit of 6 people or 2 households indoors can only take place if they are covered by a legal exemption, such as:

  • organised parent and child groups or support groups which can be attended by up to 30 people
  • for the purposes of work or volunteering. This means, for example, a tradesperson can go into a household without breaking the limit if they are there for work
  • to provide care or assistance for disabled or vulnerable people, including shopping for essential items and accessing services on their behalf.

Support bubbles

If you are eligible to form a support bubble, you and your support bubble count as one household towards the limit of 2 households when meeting others indoors. See the separate guidance on support bubbles.

Up to 6 people from different households or a larger group of up to 2 households can meet indoors without the need for a formal childcare arrangement such as a childcare bubble.

Going to work

You should continue to work from home where you can.

If you cannot work from home you should continue to travel to your workplace. You do not need to be classed as a critical worker to go to work if you cannot work from home.

Employers and employees should discuss their working arrangements, and employers should take every possible step to facilitate their employees working from home, including providing suitable IT and equipment to enable remote working. Where people cannot work from home, employers should take steps to make their workplaces COVID-19 secure and help employees avoid busy times and routes on public transport. Extra consideration should be given to those people at higher risk.

COVID-secure rules, including social distancing requirements, continue to apply in the workplace. COVID-secure guidelines are available for sectors across the economy to substantially reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.

See guidance for restrictions on businesses and venues in England

Meeting others for work

You can gather in a group larger than six people or two households indoors or in a group larger than 30 people outdoors where it is necessary for your work. When working, you should remain 2 metres from anyone you do not live with, or at least 1m with additional mitigations.

Working in other people’s homes

Where it is reasonably necessary for you to work in other people’s homes you can continue to do so, for example if you’re a:

  • nanny
  • cleaner
  • tradesperson
  • social care worker providing support to children and families

You should follow the guidance on working in other people’s homes.

Where a work meeting does not need to take place in a private home or garden, it should not.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable or live with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable

If you have been identified as clinically extremely vulnerable then you should continue to work from home where possible. If you cannot work from home, you can go to your workplace. Your employer is required to take steps to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace and should be able to explain to you the measures they have put in place to keep you safe at work. Some employers may introduce regular testing of employees as part of these measures. You may also want to consider how you get to and from work, for example, if it is possible to avoid using public transport during rush hour.

If you live with someone who is clinically extremely vulnerable then you can continue to go to work if you are unable to work from home. As an employer, you should make sure suitable arrangements are in place so that they can work safely. You should consider whether clinically extremely vulnerable individuals can take on an alternative role or change their working patterns temporarily to avoid travelling during busy periods. 

You should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of coronavirus, including what to do to reduce your risk of catching or passing on the virus at home.

If you are worried about going in to work or you cannot work

There is guidance if you need to self-isolate or cannot go to work due to coronavirus and what to do if you’re employed and cannot work.

Citizens Advice has advice if you’re worried about working, including what to do if you think your workplace is not safe, or if you live with someone vulnerable.

Support is available if you cannot work, for example if you need to care for someone or you have less work.

There is further advice for employers and employees from ACAS (the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service).

Going to school or college

School pupils and students in further education should go to school and college.

All schools, colleges and other further education settings are open for face-to-face teaching during term time. It remains very important for children and young people to attend, to support their wellbeing and education and to help working parents and guardians.

Clinically extremely vulnerable pupils and students should go to school or college.

There is further guidance on what parents need to know about early years providers, schools and colleges during COVID-19.

Rapid lateral flow testing is now available for free for everyone in England. It is recommended for all secondary school pupils and college students, their families and all school and college staff.

See the guidance on how you can get regular rapid tests if you do not have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19).

Universities and higher education

All students are now able to resume in-person teaching and learning. Students should take a test before they travel to a non-term residence.

There is guidance for universities and students starting and returning to higher education.

Students should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of COVID-19at all times.

Childcare

Up to 6 people from different households or a larger number of no more than 2 households can meet indoors without the need for a formal childcare arrangement. All children can go to registered childcare, childminders, wraparound care and other supervised children’s activities indoors and outdoors.

Parent and child groups can take place indoors as well as outdoors, with up to 30 people. Children under 5 who are accompanying a parent or guardian do not count towards this limit. See the parent and child groups section of this guidance.

Meeting others for childcare

Gatherings above the limit of 6 people or 2 households indoors, or above 30 outdoors can take place for the following purposes:

  • for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children – see further information on education and childcare
  • for arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents or guardians
  • to allow contact between birth parents and children in care, as well as between siblings in care
  • to place or facilitate the placing of a child or children in the care of another by social services

Parent and child groups

Parent and child groups can take place indoors as well as outdoors (but not in private homes or gardens) if they are for the benefit of children aged under 5 and organised by a business, charity or public body.

Parent and child groups must be limited to no more than 30 people. Children under five and anyone working or volunteering as part of the group, such as a group leader, are not counted in this number.

Providing care or assistance

Gatherings above the limit of 6 people or 2 households indoors can take place for the purposes of providing care or assistance, such as:

  • to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally permitted to form one)
  • to provide emergency assistance
  • to go to a support group of up to 30 participants. The limit of 30 does not include children under 5 who are accompanying a parent or guardian
  • to provide care or assistance for disabled or vulnerable people, including shopping for essential items and accessing services on their behalf

You can also provide care or assistance for disabled or vulnerable people inside someone’s home, where necessary.

You should follow the guidance on how to stop the spread of coronavirus at all times. There is further guidance for those who provide unpaid care to friends or family.

Support groups

Support groups can take place with up to 30 participants where officially organised to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support. Support groups must be organised by a business, charity or public body and if taking place indoors, must not take place in a private home.

There is further guidance on how to run or attend a support group safely within the guidance for the safe use of multi-purpose community facilities.

Examples of support groups include those that provide support to:

  • victims of crime (including domestic abuse)
  • those with, or recovering from, addictions (including alcohol, narcotics or other substance addictions) or addictive patterns of behaviour
  • those with, or caring for people with, any long-term illness or terminal condition or who are vulnerable (including those with a mental health condition)
  • those facing issues related to their sexuality or identity (including those living as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender)
  • those who have suffered bereavement
  • vulnerable young people (including to enable them to meet youth workers)
  • disabled people and their carers

The limit of 30 does not include children under 5 who are accompanying a parent or guardian. Where a person has a clear and formal role (paid or voluntary) to run the group or help it operate, rather than only attending as a member of the group to obtain support, they do not have to be counted as part of the gatherings limit.

Exercise, sport and physical activity

You can do unlimited exercise but there are limits on the number of people you can exercise with. You can exercise in a group of up to 30 people when outdoors. When indoors, you can exercise:

  • on your own
  • in a group of up to 6 people
  • in a larger group of any size from up to 2 households (and their support bubbles, if eligible)

You can also take part in formally organised indoor and outdoor sports or licensed physical activity with any number of people. This must be organised by a business, charity or public body and the organiser must take the required precautions, including the completion of a risk assessment. You should avoid contact in training and, for some sports, avoid contact in all activities. Read the guidance on what avoiding contact means for your sport.

Indoor leisure facilities may open for you to exercise on your own, in groups of up to 6 people or in a group of any size from up to 2 households.

You should follow the guidance:

Elite sportspeople

Elite sportspeople (or those on an official elite sports pathway) can meet in larger groups, including indoors, to compete and train. They can be joined by their coaches if necessary, or their parents and guardians if they’re under 18.

Funerals and linked commemorative events

There is no longer a maximum limit of 30 attendees at funerals. The number of people who can attend a funeral will be determined by how many people the venue can safely accommodate with social distancing measures in place.

Funerals are especially important events to the family and friends of the deceased and this is reflected in the fact that throughout the pandemic, funerals have had higher numerical limits than other life events.

Linked religious or belief-based commemorative events, such as wakes, stone settings and ash scatterings can be attended by a maximum of 30 people, not including anyone working. Commemorative events can take place in a COVID-19 Secure indoor venue, or outdoors including private gardens.

There is guidance for arranging or going to a funeral during the coronavirus pandemic.

Weddings and civil partnership ceremonies and receptions

Up to 30 people can be at a wedding, civil partnership ceremony or reception. Anyone working is not counted in these limits.

There is further guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships.

Significant life events

Significant life events such as christenings or Bar/Bat Mitzvahs can also be attended by a maximum of 30 people. Anyone working is not counted in these limits.

Places of worship

You can go to places of worship for a service. When a service is taking place indoors you must not mingle in groups larger than 6, except when everyone present is from no more than 2 households (including support bubbles). You should maintain social distancing between groups at all times.

When a service is taking place outdoors, you must not mingle in groups larger than 30. You should follow the national guidance on the safe use of places of worship.

Volunteering and charitable services

Gatherings above the limit of 6 people or 2 households indoors, or above 30 people outdoors can take place for the purposes of providing voluntary or charitable services.

You should follow the guidance on Volunteering during coronavirus (COVID-19).

Other circumstances where you can gather in larger groups

Larger gatherings mean they are above the limit of 6 people or 2 households indoors, or above 30 people outdoors.

You may gather in larger groups:

  • to provide emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness, or to escape a risk of harm (including domestic abuse)
  • to fulfil legal obligations
  • to carry out activities related to buying, selling or moving house
  • for the purpose of COVID-secure protests or picketing where the organiser has taken the required precautions, including completing a risk assessment
  • where it is reasonably necessary to support voting in an election or referendum (such as vote counting or for legal observers).

Those who are campaigning for a specific outcome in elections or referendums can carry out door-to-door campaigning activity in accordance with guidance on elections and referendums during COVID-19.

You can gather in larger groups within criminal justice accommodation or immigration detention centres.

If you break the rules

The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking up illegal gatherings and issuing fines (fixed penalty notices).

You can be given a fixed penalty notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400.

You can be fined £800 if you go to a private indoor gathering such as a house party of over 15 people from outside your household, which will double for each repeat offence to a maximum level of £6,400.

If you hold, or are involved in holding, an illegal gathering of over 30 people indoors or 50 people outdoors, the police can fine you £10,000.

Care home visits

The rules are different depending on whether you are visiting someone in a care home or a resident is having a visit out of the home.

Visiting a care home

Residents can have up to five regular visitors, with up to 2 visitors at one time or in a single day. People visiting will need to have tested negative for COVID-19 before they come inside and follow the rules on how to prevent infection from spreading. There is guidance on visiting care homes during COVID-19.

Low risk visits out of care homes

Care home residents leaving the home for a low risk visit, such as a walk in the park, will no longer have to self-isolate for 14 days when they return. There is guidance on visits out of the care home during COVID-19 for residents and care homes.

There is separate guidance for people in supported living.

Staying away from home overnight

All holiday accommodation may reopen. You can stay overnight in a:

  • hotel / Bed & Breakfast
  • campsite
  • caravan
  • boat
  • second home
  • other accommodation.

You may stay overnight in holiday accomodation in groups of up to 6, or larger groups if everyone present is from 2 households (each household can include a support bubble, if eligible) unless a legal exemption applies.

You can also stay overnight with friends and family in their homes in groups of up to 6, or larger groups if everyone present is from 2 households (including support bubbles).

Further guidance on hotels and other guest accommodation is available

Travelling within England

You should continue to plan ahead and travel safely where possible.

You can plan ahead and travel safely by taking the following precautions:

  • walk or cycle where possible
  • plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport
  • regularly wash or sanitise your hands
  • wear a face covering on public transport, unless you’re exempt
  • make sure the space is well ventilated. Open windows or take other actions to let in plenty of fresh air

You must not share a private vehicle in groups larger than 6 people (except when everyone present is from no more than 2 households), unless your journey is made for an exempt reason.

There is additional guidance on safer travel, including on the safe use of public transport.

Travelling within the UK, the Republic of Ireland and the Channel Islands

Travelling to England

Across the different parts of the Common Travel Area (the UK, the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), there may be rules in place that restrict travel to England.

You should check the restrictions in place where you intend to travel from before making arrangements to travel.

Provided you are permitted to travel from another part of the Common Travel Area (the UK, the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), you may enter England and are not required to quarantine on arrival. If you do travel to England, you must follow the restrictions on what you can and cannot do.

Travelling from England

Across the different parts of the Common Travel Area (the UK, the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man), there may be rules in place that restrict travel from England. You do not need a reasonable excuse to leave England to travel to other parts of the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man or the Republic of Ireland. You should check the restrictions in place where you intend to travel to before making arrangements to travel.

Travelling to or from Northern Ireland

If you’re travelling from within the Common Travel Area and staying overnight in Northern Ireland, you should take a rapid lateral flow device test (LFD)before you begin your journey. You should only travel if the test is negative.

If you’re travelling from Northern Ireland to other regions of the Common Travel Area and staying overnight, you should take a rapid lateral flow device test (LFD) before you begin your journey home.You should only travel if the test is negative. After you return home you should take an LFD test on day two and day eight.

There are a number of exemptions to this request.

Travelling to or from Scotland

Scottish Coronavirus regulations permit unrestricted travel within Scotland and between Scotland and England, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands, or the Isle of Man. Travel restrictions remain in place for travel between Scotland and the rest of the world. There is further guidance on travelling to and from Scotland.

Travelling to or from Wales

There are no restrictions in place for travel into or out of Wales as long as you are travelling within the UK or wider Common Travel Area (the Republic of Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man). Across the different parts of the Common Travel Area, there may be rules in place that restrict travel from Wales. You do not need a reasonable excuse to leave Wales to travel to other parts of the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man or the Republic of Ireland. You should check the restrictions in place where you intend to travel to before making arrangements to travel. This guidance provides advice on travelling to and from Wales.

International travel

Travelling internationally from England

There are no longer any restrictions on leaving England to travel internationally, however to protect public health in the UK and the vaccine rollout, you should not travel to countries or territories on the red or amber lists.

If you travel to one of these countries or territories, you should look at the rules in place at your destination and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) travel advice. You should do this even if you are returning to a place you’ve visited before.

Travelling to England from outside the UK

All visitors travelling to England are subject to the coronavirus restriction rules.

What you must do when you arrive in England from abroad depends on where you have been in the last 10 days before you arrive.

People planning to travel to England should follow the guidance on entering the UK.

Find out what list the country you are travelling from is on and what you need to do.

Advice for visitors and foreign nationals in England

Foreign nationals are subject to the national restrictions.

If you are visiting the UK, you may return home. You should check whether there are any restrictions in place at your destination.

Moving home

You can move home.

Estate and letting agents and removals firms can continue to work. If you are looking to move, you can go to property viewings.

Follow the national guidance on moving home safely, which includes advice on social distancing, letting fresh air in, and wearing a face covering.

Financial support

Wherever you live, you may be able to get financial help.

See further information on business support and financial support if you’re off work because of coronavirus.

Businesses and venues

Further venues are permitted to open. You can visit indoor venues in a group of up to 6 people from different households or a larger group of any size from up to 2 households including support bubbles.

COVID-secure rules, including social distancing requirements, continue to apply in the workplace, and in businesses and public venues.

Businesses and venues which can reopen

Indoor areas at hospitality venues (cafes, restaurants, bars, pubs, social clubs, including members’ clubs) can reopen. At any premises serving alcohol, customers will be required to order, be served and eat/drink while seated (“table service”). Venues are prohibited from providing smoking equipment such as shisha pipes, for use on the premises.

Indoor entertainment venues such as bingo halls, bowling alleys, and casinos may also reopen, as can indoor parts of outdoor attractions such as theme parks and animal attractions. Outdoor and indoor performance venues such as cinemas and theatres are also permitted to reopen.

Businesses eligible to host childcare and supervised activities for children are able to host these activities (including sport) for all children, regardless of circumstances. Indoor play centres and areas may also reopen.

Businesses and venues which must remain closed

To reduce social contact, some businesses, such as nightclubs, must remain closed or follow restrictions on how they provide goods and services.

There is further guidance on restrictions on businesses and venues in Englandwhich explains which restrictions we will seek to ease at Step 4, subject to the outcome of the events research programme, social distancing and COVID-status certification reviews

POSITIVE CASES AT WORK

Info for Positive Covid-19 Cases in the Workplace

The Virus

The virus can be spread by an individual 48 – 72 hours before their symptoms appear. It is therefore important to ensure open communication with other crew, cast and contributors who may have worked in close contact. However, it is also important to ensure that the individual’s privacy is maintained as medical information is deemed sensitive personal data.

Symptoms

If you have recent onset of any of the most important symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19):

  1. a new continuous cough
  2. a high temperature
  3. a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of smell or taste (anosmia)

you and your household must isolate at home: wearing a face covering does not change this. You should arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19.

Confirmed Positive Case

If a case is confirmed, those crew, cast and contributors who have been in close contact and/or in the same cohort, should be identified to the best of your abilities. Those individuals should be advised to seek medical advice and be asked to work from home for 10 days to monitor their symptoms, as a precautionary measure in conjunction with local health agency instructions.

What is a ‘contact’?

A ‘contact’ is a person who has been close to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 anytime from 2 days before the person was symptomatic up to 10 days from onset of symptoms (this is when they are infectious to others).This includes anyone you have been within 2 meters of for 15 minutes or more. The same rule applies if you have been in a car or vehicle with someone.

Keep a Record

The recording of key dates, location of meetings, recces and movements of the crew, cast or contributor will help inform local health agencies and help the production to identify other staff/crew or cast members who may have been in close contact. 

Positive Result

positive result means the individual had COVID-19 when the test was done. If their test is positive, they must self-isolate immediately.

  • If they had a test because they had symptoms, they should keep self-isolating for at least 10 days from when their symptoms started. 
  • If they had a test but have not had symptoms, they should self-isolate for 10 days from when they had the test. 
  • Anyone they live with, and anyone in their close contact bubble, must self-isolate for 10 days from when you start self-isolating. 

Inconclusive Test

An unclear, void, borderline or inconclusive result means it’s not possible to say if the individual had COVID-19 when the test was done. Another test should be arranged as soon as possible. If the individual had a test but did not have not any symptoms, they do not need to self-isolate while they are waiting to get another test. People they live with, and anyone in their close contact bubble, do not need to self-isolate.

Self Isolating ASAP

They should self-isolate as soon as possible, if they are at work they should return home directly, and order a test online athttps://www.nhs.uk/ask-for-a-coronavirus-test. If they don’t have access to the internet, a test can be ordered by calling 119 (in England, Wales and Northern Ireland) or 0300 303 2713 (in Scotland).

It is important that they do not get too close to other people and maintain a minimum of 2m distance from others in order to reduce the risk of transmitting infection.

Resources;

Isolating Guidance Gov UK

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection

ICO Data Protection in the Workplace

https://ico.org.uk/global/data-protection-and-coronavirus-information-hub/coronavirus-recovery-data-protection-advice-for-organisations/

Gov UK List of Covid Testing Providers

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/list-of-private-providers-of-coronavirus-testing

nations & regions productions uk

To count towards the regional production quota by hours, relevant productions must meet two out of the following three criteria:

(1) Substantive base

The commissioned production company must have a substantive business and production base in the UK outside the M25, and the production in question must be managed from that substantive base.

The base will be taken to be substantive if it is the usual place of employment of:

  • executives managing the regional business; and
  • senior personnel involved in the production in question; and
  • senior personnel involved in seeking programme commissions.

(2) Production spend

At least 70% of the production spend must be spent in the UK outside the M25.

Production spend should be based on the entire production expenditure including any funding from third parties and spend outside the UK, and excluding the cost of on-screen talent, archive material, sports rights, competition prize-money, copyright costs and any production fee (other than where some of the production fee is used to fund the costs of the production). Legal fees count as relevant spend.

(3) Off-screen talent

At least 50% of the production talent (i.e. not on-screen talent) by cost must have their usual place of employment in the UK outside the M25. Freelancers without a usual place of employment outside the M25 will nonetheless count for this purpose if they live outside the M25.

Resources:

UK TEST TO RELEASE SCHEME

SWAB TEST. Patient and medical supervisor preparing for a COVID-19 nasal swab test. Image created by Russell Tate. Submitted for United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives – help stop the spread of COVID-19.

Why Quarantine is important

Quarantining will help prevent family, friends and the community from contracting coronavirus, as well as helping to protect the NHS

What is Test-to-Release?

Any Travellers arriving into the UK must undergo a mandatory 10 day quarantine as per current Government Guidelines. This quarantine period can be reduced to 5 days by producing a negative result using the government approved Test-to-Release scheme on day 5 of your arrival.

How the Test to Release scheme works

If you arrive in England from somewhere outside the UK, Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man you must quarantine for 10 days on arrival.

Under the Test to Release scheme you can choose to pay for a private COVID-19 test. If the result is negative, you can end your quarantine.

You cannot take a test until you have been in England for 5 full days.

The scheme is voluntary and applies to those quarantining in England only.

If you do not want to opt into the Test to Release scheme, you will need to quarantinefor 10 days.

What do I need to do to take part in the scheme?

To take part in the scheme you need to:

You will be asked to enter details of your test in the passenger locator form. You must do this to take part in the scheme.

When do I book the tests?

You should book your test before you travel to England. This is so you can enter details of the test when you opt into the scheme on the passenger locator form. If you decide to take part in the scheme after you have arrived in England, you will need to complete another passenger locator form.

Do I pay for the test myself?

Yes, You will have to pay the private test provider for your test. You will need to book an individual test for each person opting into Test to Release, including children.

The test provider will either send a test to your address or you can attend a testing site. You may leave your house to post your test or to travel directly to and from the testing site. You should follow safer travel guidance and avoid public transport if possible.

What do I do If me test is negative?

If the test result is negative you can stop quarantine as soon as you receive the result.

What do I do If I test positive for COVID-19?

If the test is positive you need to quarantine for another 10 days. Count the 10 days starting from the day after you took the test, or from when you first had symptoms if that is earlier.

People you live with in the UK, or people you are staying with, should also quarantine for 10 days from the date of your positive test.

You do not need to take the coronavirus test on or after day 8.

What happens if my test is inconclusive?

If the result from your test is inconclusive you must continue to quarantine. You can choose to take another privately provided test to find out if you can stop quarantine early.

You may be fined if you do not quarantine. The fine is £1,000 for the first time, up to £10,000 for further breaches.

Resources;

GOV UK Guidance

https://www.gov.uk/uk-border-control/ending-self-isolation-early-through-test-to-release

Private Test Providers

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/list-of-private-providers-of-coronavirus-testing/list-of-private-providers-of-coronavirus-testing

Fill in the Passenger Locater Form

https://www.gov.uk/provide-journey-contact-details-before-travel-uk

Travelling to Northern Ireland

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/coronavirus-covid-19-international-travel-advice

Travelling to Wales

https://gov.wales/how-isolate-when-you-travel-wales-coronavirus-covid-19

Travelling to Scotland

https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-international-travel-quarantine/pages/overview/